Peace and Security Funding Index: An Analysis of Global Foundation Grantmaking 

On June 7, 2016, Carnegie Corporation of New York hosted a group of over 40 funders, policymakers, and practitioners for a discussion on PSFG's recently released Peace and Security Funding Index, and what the results mean for the peacebuilding sector.

PSFG presented the report’s key findings, showcasing where peace and security funders are having an outsized impact on global peace and stability. Following the presentation, participants discussed the challenges and opportunities facing the field of peace and security. Peacebuilding experts discussed the current state of peacebuilding as a pillar of the peace and security field, opportunities for private foundations to fill gaps in the field, and next steps. Here is a summary of the analysis.


To Fund or Not to Fund: Considerations Around
Making Grants to Counter Violent Extremism

In February 2015, the White House held a Summit on Countering Violent Extremism (CVE), bringing the topic to the forefront for the peace and security community. CVE, a term coined by the United States Government (USG), is the framing given to a range of activities intended to prevent people from joining violent movements and engaging in violent activities, especially when motivated by ideology (religious or political).

Preceding – and increasingly since – the Summit, the Peace and Security Funders Group (PSFG) has been approached by a number of members of the USG (the White House, State Department, and Department of Homeland Security) to discuss the opportunities for foundations and philanthropists to engage in the CVE space. This white paper looks at key takeaways from the last 15 months and recommends some options for advancing the conversation about whether and how funders should engage in CVE.


Launching the Peace & Security Funding Index 

On April 5, 2016, PSFG launched the first-of-its-kind Peace and Security Funding Index in partnership with the Foundation Center and released a report on the Index’s key findings. We undertook this project to better understand who is active in the peace and security funding field, and how this funding was being deployed and utilized.

In 2013, 288 foundations supported over 1,200 organizations with more than $283 million spread across nearly 2,000 grants. Our research found that peace and security funders are making important contributions to global peace and stability, despite making up less than 1% of total foundation giving. To learn more, visit www.peaceandsecurityindex.org.


The Role of Funders in Conflict

Over the course of last year, PSFG convened a series of conversations around the role of funders in conflict. Our white paper and accompanying chart summarize these discussions, and recommend next steps to improve the efficacy of funders working in conflict and post-conflict settings. Our "top tips" (pictured below) can also be found here.

In addition to summarizing the discussions, the white paper recommends next steps to improve the efficacy of funders working in challenging conflict and post-conflict settings. We see this paper as the starting point for continued engagement on this topic and look forward to future collaboration. 


Philanthropic Investments in the Emerging Field of
Women, Peace and Security

The report discusses the origins and components of this new field. Based on extensive data collected by PSFG, the report presents a snapshot of private foundation giving in the women, peace, and security field. Click here to download a copy.

In addition, please download and share our compelling "pocket guide" that details the importance of investing in women, peace, and security. This was made possible by support from the Women Donors Network's "Women Building a Just Peace" Circle.


Peace and Security Grantmaking
by U.S. Foundations, 2008 - 2009

This report presents a detailed view of peace and security grantmaking in 2008 and 2009, examining the sources, recipients and purposes of foundation support. Its analysis is based on a database of over 2,000 individual grants from 91 foundations, totaling over $257 million. Click here to download a copy. Click here to download supplemental information to the report, including profiles of the top grantmaking foundations and tables of funding for strategies by foundation.

Errata:
Table 11: Top Grant Recipients (over $1 million), 2008-2009. The total funding to International Institute for Strategic Studies for 2008 -2009 was incorrectly reported as $2,205,000. The actual amount of funding was $2,565,000, making it the 13th largest grant recipient in total 2008-2009 funding.
Table 12: Ten Largest Grants in 2008 incorrectly lists the recipient of the 10th largest grant as the International Institute for Strategic Studies. The recipient of this $1.2M, three-year grant from the MacArthur Foundation was the National Bureau for Asian Research.


Collaboration Lessons Learned

Collaboration is critical to solving today's toughest challenges. The Connect U.S. Fund - a donors' collaborative launched to support and facilitate collaboration - published a white paper on lessons learned from its decade in the field.


2012 Colloquium on Peacebuilding Effectiveness Summit

The Purdue Peace Project (PPP) and the Peace and Security Funders Group (PSFG) co-sponsored the Colloquium on Peacebuilding Effectiveness (COPE) in Washington D. C. Leaders from experienced organizations around the world gathered in order to discuss the current state of the peacebuilding field. The organizations represented practitioner, policymaker, and funder perspectives. Participants discussed (1) the nature of peacebuilding work; (2) how its effectiveness is, and should be, defined; and (3) principles that should be considered when doing and funding peacebuilding work. This report summarizes those discussions.

 

Note: This report was supported (but not written) by PSFG.